Potatoes, Weaving and Feeding at The Garden House March 27 2015

It was the last week of term at Wednesday Gardening Group this week, and unfortunately I wasn't there to enjoy it. The first gardening group that I've missed which was a shame, but luckily, my lovely friend Gabriella of Mangia Bene Blog volunteered to give you this week's update and she took some beautiful pictures to go with it! 

Over to Gabriella to tell you what everyone got up to and a picture of hellebores to start us off... 

Hellebores at The Garden House. Photo by Mangia Bene Blog.

"Today was the last day of term for Wednesday Gardening Group. Sadly, I won’t be able to make the new term after Easter, but I will definitely be checking into the What You Sow blog to keep updated with all The Garden House antics.

There were three main jobs for us to do today – plant potatoes, weave the wooden arches and feed the beds.

Potatoes at The Garden House. Photo by Mangia Bene Blog.                Potatoes at The Garden House. Photo by Mangia Bene Blog.

The potatoes were being planted in a bed, which already had rhubarb, artichokes and lettuces growing in it. We prepared the bed by digging up the winter lettuces that were ready to eat. Then we raked the soil and dug some trenches ready for the potatoes to be planted in. When planting potatoes make sure the eyes of the potato are facing up.

Lettuce at The Garden House. Photo by Mangia Bene Blog.                Lettuce at The Garden House. Photo by Mangia Bene Blog.

Planting potatoes at The Garden House. Photo by Mangia Bene Blog.

Planting potatoes at The Garden House. Photo by Mangia Bene Blog.                Planting potatoes at The Garden House. Photo by Mangia Bene Blog.

The bed where the alliums were planted in last week needed to be weeded and also fed. This time of year is the perfect time to feed your garden.

Weeding the allium bed at The Garden House. Photo by Mangia Bene Blog.

The smell coming from the alliums was incredible, almost like wild garlic. We then realised it was an onion smell and of course alliums are from the onion family. Amazing!

Cornus stolonifera flaveriamea at The Garden House. Photo by Mangia Bene Blog.              Cornus stolonifera flaveriamea at The Garden House. Photo by Mangia Bene Blog.

Cornus stolonifera flaveriamea at The Garden House. Photo by Mangia Bene Blog.

 

Cornus stolonifera flaveriamea at The Garden House. Photo by Mangia Bene Blog.

We cut the yellow barked dogwood (cornus stolonifera flaveriamea) right back to the ground ready for it to grow again. The beautiful yellowy green twigs were not thrown away, but instead used for weaving in between the wooden arches we’d put up a few weeks ago. The twigs weren’t as pliable as the silver birch, but with a little manipulation they moved through nicely. We cut the ends off to give a neater look and tied some string around them for extra strength. The colour of the twigs looked incredible against the birch. The weaving was not just for looks, it will be were the sweet peas climb up once they’re planted. The area where the sweet peas will be  planted were prepared by putting some moistened newspaper into the soil. I really can’t wait to see how it all looks when it grows!

Planting sweet peas at The Garden House. Photo by Mangia Bene Blog.                Planting sweet peas at The Garden House. Photo by Mangia Bene Blog.

We also used the dogwood twigs to make a really effective and pretty edging to a bed."

Cornus stolonifera flaveriamea at The Garden House. Photo by Mangia Bene Blog.

Cornus stolonifera flaveriamea at The Garden House. Photo by Mangia Bene Blog.

 

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